The New Wave of Imaging

Computer Integration

Advances in robotic technology and software systems have improved clinicians’ ability to detect abnormalities on a scan and enabled surgeons to perform complex procedures with greater precision than ever before.

Examples

New video gaming technology allows surgeons to use simple hand gestures to change, move or zoom in on images captured by CT, MRI and other imaging devices during a complex procedure. Vascular surgeons are using the software to place a stent in a clogged artery or repair a vessel damaged by an aneurysm faster and with more precision. The technology also holds promise for neurosurgery.

Using high-speed pattern recognition to pinpoint dense areas that could signal tiny tumors or disease, computer-aided detection (CAD) enhances physicians’ ability to read scans and quickly spot abnormalities. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the first CAD system for mammograms, and the technology is also being used to find colorectal polyps, spot lung nodules and diagnose coronary heart disease and congenital heart defects. In a study of 46 people who underwent computed tomography (CT) imaging for lung cancer, New York University researchers reported that use of CAD significantly improved physicians’ detection of ground-glass lung nodules and solid tumors.

In a study of 46 people who underwent computed tomography (CT) imaging for lung cancer, New York University researchers reported that use of computer-aided detection significantly improved detection of ground-glass lung nodules and solid tumors.

A study found that use of temporal subtraction – one component of computer-aided detection (CAD) – for bone scans significantly improved diagnostic accuracy.

With new video gaming technology, surgeons can use simple hand gestures to change, move or zoom in on images captured by CT, MRI and other imaging devices during complex procedures, such as placing a stent in a clogged artery.